News

Back

Finns trust science

Finns place great trust in science, both as an institution and as named organisations, it was revealed today in the Finnish Science Barometer 2016. The standard of Finnish science and research is considered good, and people generally have faith in science's ability to generate reliable and correct results.

The survey, which was commissioned by Tieteen tiedotus ry (the association for scientific communications), analyses Finns' attitudes to science and scientific and technical advancement.

The topics of most interest were nature and the environment – about four out of five respondents follow developments in these areas (81% interested or quite interested). Social issues came in second (74%). Interest in science, research and politics in general has risen slightly since 2013. 

Women are more interested in culture and entertainment than men, whilst men are more interested in sports and the economy than women. Both genders have an equal interest in environmental and social issues. Men in particular follow topics relating to science, research and technology.

According to the survey, the age group that is most interested in science is younger adults aged 26–35.

PICTURE: SHUTTERSTOCK

 

Universities and higher-education institutions engender trust

Finns have a high level of trust in universities and higher-education institutions (75%), almost as much as in the defence forces. Of the scientific and research organisations named in the Barometer, the highest scorers were VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (59%) followed by Tekes (50%) and the Academy of Finland (50%). The more encompassing and slightly more generalised category of the scientific community was very highly placed, right after universities and higher-education institutions (66%).

The survey commissioned by Tieteen tiedotus ry also studied how familiar Finns were with Finnish scientific achievements. AIV fodder was the most recognised. Second place was taken by achievements concerning mobile phones, mobile technology and Nokia. Xylitol came in third right behind mobile phones. Genetic research and technology was also highly placed. Other areas that received plenty of mentions were cancer research, treatment and medication; and Linux, whose global spread started from CSC's servers.

CSC also seeks to promote scientific communications. One example of this is the Perfect Equation campaign, which was launched in March in cooperation with Vapa Media and with the support of Tieteen tiedotus ry. CSC's news, blogs and online magazine regularly publish articles about science, research, networks, training, data, and information management.

 


More information about the survey:

  • The Finnish Science Barometer 2016 survey was commissioned by Tieteen tiedotus ry and carried out by Yhdyskuntatutkimus Oy
  • 1,056 people responded to the written survey
  • The Finnish Science Barometer on Tieteen tiedotus ry's website
     

See also: